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5ThingstoGetYourChildsOralHealthontheRightTrack

Boosting your child's oral health and development should start early—even before their first tooth comes in! Getting off to the right start will pay dividends well into their adult years.

Here are 5 things to do, then, to help your child develop great oral health during their earliest years.

Begin oral hygiene early. To lower your child's risk of tooth decay, begin wiping out their mouth with a clean cloth after nursing to limit bacteria. When teeth do come in, gently brush them with just a dab of toothpaste, which you can gradually increase to a pea-size when they get older. Later, add flossing as well as training them to brush and floss for themselves.

Avoid too much sugar. Carbohydrates like refined sugar feed bacteria that cause tooth decay. To reduce these bacteria, moderate your child's sugar consumption by limiting sweets to meal times and cutting back on sodas, juices, and other types of sweetened drinks. Avoid bedtime bottles filled with these types of beverages including breast milk or formula.

Visit the dentist by age 1. Starting dental visits on or before your child's first birthday will help you stay one step ahead of any developing dental problems. Furthermore, children who get in the routine early for regular dental visits have a better time adjusting to them, and they're less likely to develop long-term anxiety over seeing the dentist.

Take advantage of fluoride. Tiny amounts of fluoride ingestion can give your child an edge over tooth decay. To take advantage of fluoride, use fluoride toothpaste and fluoridated water, if your utility adds it. Your dentist can also directly apply fluoride to children's teeth high risk for decay. Be careful, though, because too much fluoride can cause staining. Talk with your dentist, then, about staying within fluoride limits.

Set the example. Children often follow their parents' lead—if you take your own dental care seriously, they will too. Make daily hygiene a family affair by brushing and flossing together. Let them also see that going to the dentist is a snap. By staying calm and relaxed yourself, they'll be less likely to be nervous about dental care.

If you would like more information on dental care for children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Top 10 Oral Health Tips for Children.”

By Highland Dental
June 07, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implant  
WhatsInvolvedinGettingaDentalImplant

Although the term "surgery" is broad enough to drive a proverbial truck through, we can roughly categorize procedures as either major or minor. Installing an implant is decidedly in the minor column.

Akin to having a tooth extraction, implant surgery can be done painlessly in a dentist's office with very little discomfort afterward. If you're considering a dental implant, going through this surgical procedure shouldn't worry you.

Still, it's hard not to feel a little nervous about any type of surgery, even one as minor as getting an implant. That's where shining a little more light in the way of information can help dissolve any lingering anxiety. Here, then, is an overview of dental implant surgery from start to finish.

First, a little planning. Preparation beforehand helps eliminate any potential snags during surgery. During earlier visits, your dentist will completely map out the procedure with x-rays or CT scanning of your jaws to locate any obstacles, followed by the preparation of a surgical guide placed in the mouth to direct drilling.

Numbing the pain. The dentist begins the surgery by completely deadening the area with local anesthesia. This is usually done with an anesthetic swab of the surface gums to numb the needle prick, which is then used to deliver the remaining anesthetic to the deeper tissues and bone.

Creating the channel. After ensuring the area is fully anesthetized, the dentist will expose the bone by making small incisions in the gums. Then, using the surgical guide, they'll drill a small hole, incrementally enlarging it until it matches the size of the implant post.

Installing the implant. After drilling, the dentist removes the implant from its sterile packaging and directly places it into the prepared channel. The dentist then ensures the implant positioning is correct, often checking with additional x-rays. They'll then suture the gums back into place to protect the implant.

You may initially have a few days of mild discomfort, usually manageable with over-the-counter pain relievers. Over the next few weeks new bone cells will form and adhere to the implant to create a durable bond. You'll then be ready for the attachment of a life-like crown.

Surgery is one step in a long process. But it's an important step—and with the resulting smile outcome, well worth it.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Surgery.”

By Highland Dental
May 28, 2022
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   oral health  
3ThingsYouCanDotoUpYourPersonalDentalCareGame

Although your dentist plays an important supporting role, you are actually the starring actor in your dental care. What you do daily at home makes the greatest impact on the dynamic state of your oral health.

The more you can become a "master" in your own dental care, the more likely your teeth and gums will remain healthy. It's also less likely you'll have much of a need to see the dentist beyond your regular cleanings and checkups.

Here, then, are 3 things you can do to improve personal teeth and gum care.

Improve your brushing. Brushing your teeth is primarily a physical skill. The more you do it, the better at it you'll likely become. And, the better you are, the more effective you'll be with removing disease-causing dental plaque. It begins with the right equipment: preferably a soft-bristled, multi-tufted toothbrush that feels comfortable in your hand. Technique-wise, focus on being thorough but gentle to avoid damaging your enamel and gums.

Floss daily. Although a lot of people think of brushing and flossing as two different tasks (with many doing the former while neglecting the latter), it's better to think of them as two parts of the same goal of removing dental plaque. While brushing clears away plaque from broad surfaces, flossing removes it from between teeth where a toothbrush can't reach. If flossing isn't your thing, try floss picks or water flossers.

Put the brakes on sugar. Of all the things you eat, refined sugar is probably the most detrimental to your dental health. The oral bacteria that cause disease readily consume any sugar lingering in the mouth, which fuels their growth. It's especially problematic when constant snacking on sweets (or drinking sweetened beverages) provides a continuous supply. So, cut back as much as possible on sweets, or limit your consumption of sugary foods to meal times.

As we said before, your dentist does have a role to play in your oral health, so be sure you're paying them a visit at least every six months. These visits plus your due diligence at home will help ensure your teeth and gums stay healthy.

If you would like more information on personal dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “10 Tips For Daily Oral Care at Home.”

BrieBellaShowsOffHerSix-MonthOldsBabyTeethonInstagram

If you're aiming for adorable camera shots, nothing beats baby photos. Even the tough guys among us can't resist oohing and ahhing over pics of their friends' and families' newest editions. Even celebrities like Brie Bella, WWE wrestler and now activewear entrepreneur, get into the act. She recently posted photos of her six-month old son, Buddy, for Instagramers. The focus—Baby Buddy's new baby teeth.

For many, a baby's first teeth are almost as cute as the baby themselves. Like the tiny humans sporting them, baby (or primary) teeth look like miniature versions of adult teeth. But aside from their inherent cuteness, primary teeth are also critically important for a child's dental function and development.

For most kids, primary teeth come right on time as they begin their transition from mother's milk or formula to solid food that requires chewing. Aside from their importance in nutrition, primary teeth also play a prominent role in a child's speech development and burgeoning social interaction.

They're also fundamental to bite development, with an influence that extends beyond their lifespan. They serve as placeholders for the permanent teeth, "trailblazers" of a sort that guide future teeth toward proper eruption.

So critical is this latter role that losing a baby tooth prematurely can open the door to bite problems. When a baby tooth is lost before its time, the space they're holding for an incoming tooth could be overtaken by neighboring teeth. This in turn could force the intended tooth to erupt out of place, leading to cascading misalignments that could require future orthodontics to correct.

Although facial trauma can cause premature tooth loss, the most common reason is tooth decay. One form of this disease known as early childhood caries (ECC) is especially problematic—it can rapidly develop and spread to other teeth.

Fortunately, there are ways to avoid early primary tooth loss. Here are a few things you can do to prevent that from happening.

  • Clean your baby's teeth daily by brushing and later flossing to remove bacterial plaque, the major cause of tooth decay;
  • Limit your baby's sugar consumption. In particular, avoid bedtime bottles filled with milk, juice or formula;
  • "Child-proof" your child's play areas to lessen their chances of falling on hard surfaces that could injure teeth;
  • Begin regular dental visits around their first birthday for early diagnosis, treatment and the application of other disease prevention measures.

Like Brie Bella, it's a joy for many parents to show off their baby's first teeth. Just be sure to take these common sense steps to protect those primary teeth from an unwelcome early departure.

If you would like more information about children's dental care, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Age One Dental Visit.”

TheProcessforanImplantMayBeLongorShortbuttheResultIstheSame

How long does it take to get a dental implant? That depends….

Really, it does! There are a number of factors that determine whether you can get a new implant tooth "in one day" or whether you'll need to wait several weeks or months after implant surgery. By far, the top factor will be the health of your implant's supporting bone.

The bone plays an essential role in both the durability and appearance of an implant. Bone cells begin to accumulate on the titanium metal post after its installment to form a solid hold that could last for decades. Positioning the implant just right within the bone also ensures the resulting tooth looks natural and attractive.

If the bone is healthy, you might qualify for the "tooth in one day" procedure in which the dentist places (or loads) a life-like crown onto the implant at the same time that they install the implant. Because the bone and implant still need to fully integrate, this is a temporary crown designed to apply less force while biting. After a few weeks, the dentist will then install the full-sized permanent crown.

Not everyone, though, has enough healthy bone to support the tooth-in-one-day procedure, or even to install an implant in the first place. A patient must have enough bone present to both support the implant and to ensure proper placement. Bone loss, a common malady for people who've lost teeth, could derail the implant process.

It's often possible, however, to reverse this situation. By grafting bone-like material into the site, a person may be able to eventually regain some of the bone they've lost, enough to support an implant. Even so, this adds time to the beginning of the process and the patient may still need to undergo full bone-implant integration before receiving any type of crown.

As you can see, how long the implant process takes can depend a great deal on the condition of the bone your dentist has to work. But regardless of the duration, the end result will be an attractive and durable implant tooth.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Implant Timelines for Replacing Missing Teeth.”





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